Making Progress

It’s hard to believe that it’s almost two months since I started my toilet project.  Yes I know.   However things are still moving in the right direction albeit a little slowly.  Most of the delay has been introduced – not because of a lack of time to do things but because of a lack of decision on some of the essentials and of course things take a lot longer than you imagine they will.  Flooring and tiling have to be chosen and ordered and it’s best to install both of these before hanging the toilet itself.  One can tile around the toilet afterwards but the effect won’t be as clean and I’ve no intention to cut corners on this job.

At least now the old toilet is out and the new frame is in.  Here is a work in progress from a few weeks ago.

Toilet frame

The Geberit corner frame is really simple to fit – four bolts hold it to the walls and floor.  The waste pipe is easily cut and snapped into place but one thing I overlooked was how the plasterboard would then attach to the frames.  Probably I was missing the Geberit rail system for this however as things turned out I had enough purchase with the existing insulation joists to make a solid enough fit for these thick panels.  As you can see though they are now on, the sink is in place, the walls are insulated and plasterboarded completely.

P1040329

Underfloor heating has been considered, discarded and considered again but it seems overkill so we’re erring on the side of an electric radiator for the room.  Once the floor is insulated (with the plywood subfloor you can see below) and the vinyl tiles we’ve selected glued down it should certainly be warm enough underfoot.

The next step will be to get some professionals in to plaster and tile the room.  The finish is important and I don’t want to mess up the finishing touches.  I have tiled before, and I am tempted to do it (and still may yet be) but like I say, the finish is important.

Then once we have a radiator I also have to fix up or replace the window in the room and also replace the glass above and in the door, then we can paint and we’re done.  Hopefully by the spring time..

I promised something to follow up on my post about one-man projects.  And I have a lot of thoughts on this stemming from both software and toilets, however, this post is going to have to wait a little longer.

Happy New Year to all those handy, software people out there.

Loo-sing It

I’ve created a little spreadsheet costing up the various bits I’ve assembled so far for the toilet replacement.  It’s pretty much on budget so far but that will soon get blown by the tiling and flooring as of course they didn’t come in as prime considerations at the time I started planning.  Initial thoughts went like this:

 Hey.  Let’s change the toilet!

  • Ok, first we need to rip out the old one and replace it with a snazzy new one on a frame!
  • Yeah, and a new sink!
  • Yeah, and new walls!
  • Cool, let’s get all that stuff and make a start!

The stuff duly arrives plus I spend two weekends trawling DIY shops and I’ve done the prep work and then I eventually realise that as this is a wall mounted toilet you need to work out what the final floor height will be for that to make any sense.  I will also need to tile the frame of the toilet before I can actually mount the thing.  So despite the fact I’ve got most of the stuff now I actually still need tiles and floor right now if I’m to mount it correctly and keep downtime to a minimum.

Small rooms mean lots of thinking.  Plumbing supplies no matter how ‘easy fit’ still require planning and have proprietary hieroglyphs and youtubes instead of written instructions.  I bought a flexible water hose to connect the cistern because that was the only one I could find with the right fitting in the shop.  I wasn’t totally sure I wanted to install a flexible hose where I couldn’t see it and finally I find a step-by-step guide to doing this kind of thing that says No, Don’t Use A Flexible Hose – Use Copper Pipe You Moron.  I then realise I should’ve just ordered the default compression joint it recommended alongside with the toilet as that would have saved this hassle.  Then I start panicking that I’ve got the wrong thickness plasterboard for tiling over and that my walls will now come out too far and basically it’s all a complete disaster.

However, it’s not a disaster.  Not yet.  I’m essentially no further on than I was two weeks ago but I’ve managed to half fit the sink and I at least have a roomful of bits.  I’m still running a simulation on the second part of this build – assembling parts, playing through scenarios.  It’s certainly 90% planning when you’re doing this for the first time.  It’s mentally exhausting but I’m learning a lot.  I’m also very glad I didn’t take the old toilet out just yet..

Replacing an Art Deco toilet

I’m lucky enough to live in a nice neighbourhood in Amsterdam dating from when the Olympics were last in town in 1928.  The style of the houses is the know collectively as the Amsterdamse school and is typified by an Art Deco and Expressionist theme – curves, use of repeating lines, horizontal ladder effects, extensive use of marble and occasionally opulent materials all go to give the streets an almost magical character if you’re a fan of the style.  These themes are continued in wood, window frames, chimney breasts inside the houses.

While our house is not amazing to look at from the outside it has some lovely detailing in plaster and wood, big single glazed windows and high ceilings which look fantastic but have of course made the place pretty cold and prone to draughts.  This goes double for the toilets which both are on external double brick, uninsulated walls that are tiled with a stone floor.  Having survived three cold winters with these toilets we (particularly female house members) finally have had enough of their cold beauty and I’ve plucked up enough courage to start to tackle them.

So prompted by impending Winter this weekend I’ve finally made a start on the first toilet with a view to improving thermal performance and make it reasonably modern looking while preserving its Art Deco heritage.  Here is a before photo:

Note the beautiful stone floor, the large amount of tiles, the precariously perched sink, the lovely window frame and the hideous glass above the door.  It’s a real mixed bag of a room and currently it’s very cold with no heating.  My plan is to put in a false wall with 2cm polystyrene insulation along with a free standing corner built floating toilet.  Finally we’ll cover that freezing floor with some thin space-age insulation I’ve found and on top of that some form of easily maintainable surface.  The sink will be replaced with something sympathetic but less splashy (see the current height of the tap) and we may even put a heated towel rail in there too.

So far, I’ve stripped the tiles and made a start on the plasterboard and insulation.  As it’s double brick I’ll have to watch the ventilation as the bricks will still need to breathe out the moisture they absorb if they’re not to freeze and crack.  I’ll be saving some of the original tiles for re-use.  A lot were already damaged and broken on the wall as they had been applied directly to brick in mortar and patched up multiple times.  Despite that though they seemed to come off easily enough…

Next week I’ll work up to replacing the toilet itself, mounting the new sink and finishing off the walls.  Then the part I’ll be really looking forward too is the detailing and seeing what I can re-use and save from the room, what I can improve.  The intention is of course it should be a lot warmer but I also want this room to become an updated version of its original intention.  If I can get it right here then perhaps I’ll get motivated enough to tackle the other toilet, the kitchen and the million other things that will then need doing.